Blog - Alaska Fly Out

Costa De Cocos Mexico Trip Report

Wait - That's not Alaska

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Every year, when the Alaska fishing season winds down, we host a trip to one or two of our favorite international destinations. We just got back from a great trip to Costa De Cocos in Xcalak, Mexico with a group from the Santa Cruz Fly Fishing Club. Although most members of the group are seasoned anglers, all but a couple had any saltwater flats fishing experience. So, we all knew that the first few days would be a crash course on technique, fish recognition, objectives, etc. We were primarily targeting bonefish, tarpon, permit, and barracuda. The bonefish in this part of the Caribbean can get as big as 6 pounds, with most of them averaging between 2-4 pounds. All of the anglers in the group quickly realized what the chatter about bonefish was all about. Very few 20-inch fish in Alaska will rip you to your backing in the first run. Pound for pound, these little monsters are some of the strongest sport fish in the world. 

Part of the appeal of fly fishing to me is that it is challenging. Flats fishing for bonefish, tarpon, and permit can be challenging! I don't like "tough" fishing anymore than the next angler, but I can say that I gain much satisfaction during the learning process of a new sport, process, technique, etc - even when I am struggling. I believe all 8 anglers felt the satisfaction of putting everything together this week - seeing the fish, making a great cast, strip set, and landing the fish. That's what it's all about. 

For the months of July through November, Costa De Cocos offers a 2 for 1 discount for an all-inclusive package at $2,050 Per Peson (6-Day/7-Night Package). Although this is the tail-end of the rainy season in Mexico, believe me, you will be hard pressed to find this type of value anywhere else. Contact us with questions.

From the Gallery: 

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Alaska's Angling Addiction - Our Story

By Lee Kuepper

We had the pleaser to spend a few evenings with Paul and Lee from Alaska's Angling Addiction, shooting some video for our newest film. These guys are first class, and they are extremely good at what they do. The two of them have great energy, and you can feel that when you're on the water with them. They have the right mindset about stewardship toward the Kenai fishery, and their values toward conservation are admirable. Both Paul and Lee are too humble to come out and say it, but when it comes to giant Kenai River Rainbows - they're the best. This is their story. 

Long Live the King - Official Trailer

By Fly Out Media

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Montana Fly CompanyTrout Unlimited - F3T - The Drake Magazine - Loon Outdoors

Long Live the King is a story of hope and resurgence for Alaska's great King Salmon fishery. Returning numbers of the fish have been dropping steadily, and both 2012 and 2013 hit especially hard - with multiple rivers and regions across the state seeing some of the lowest returns ever, forcing Alaska Fish and Game officials to close or severely limit salmon fishing around the state, including on some of Alaska's most iconic rivers. In addition, what is starting to seem like an all out war on salmon – mining, dams, hatcheries and the state government are all marching forward in opposition of Alaska treasure salmon resource. For many, this is an attack on religion, not just a fish.

This film seeks to ignite an angler's passion - showing why salmon are worth fighting for from a fly fishing perspective. By showcasing some of Alaska's world class adventures - a team of Alaska's best guides and anglers explore the state's rivers, fly fishing for King Salmon, while practicing "catch and release" for the benefit of greater escapement and future salmon spawn. Through interviews and candid conversation, we will hear from long-time Alaska guides, lodge owners, Native elders, political figures, conservation leaders, and wilderness pioneers who have an abundance of untapped folk information on the state's great King Salmon lore. In these virtually untold stories, lies the spirit of Alaska - the dream of its wild lands and freedoms that can hardly be imagined in our current time.

King Salmon are an icon for Alaska, and a treasured sport fish for the entire world. Long Live the King celebrates the great homecoming of salmon to the Last Frontier, while promoting a re-energized culture of sustainability among salmon fishermen and women worldwide. Through inspiring imagery, explosive fishing, emotional testimony and a tone of sustainability, respect, and stewardship, the film breathes new life into the hearts of anglers. One goal of this film is to boost the grassroots efforts of our conservation partners to defend the land, waters, cultural heritage, and invaluable resources of Alaska, including the mighty King Salmon of the Last Frontier.

Music: "300 Violin Orchestra" by Jorge Quintero

Lodges and Outfitters

Waypoints - Alaska Segment

From Confluence Films

Everybody's been waiting anxiously to see the World Premiere of Confluence Films new production - Waypoints. They've been releasing short segments from the film, showing a glimpse of each destination featured in the film - Sponsored by The Drake Magazine.

This short is from the Alaska steelhead segment, starring one of our heroes - Rooster Leavens. You can find the tour dates for your state HERE

Indie Alaska - I am a Bush Pilot

With Willy Fulton

From Indie Alaska: 

Alaska bush pilot Willy Fulton is known for his experience in flying to remote locations, and his direct, likable personality.

Fulton is also known as the pilot who last flew Timothy Treadwell, and ultimately came upon Treadwell's remains in Katmai National Park.

While that story and the Werner Herzog film "Grizzly Man" brought attention to the pilot, Fulton is a character in his own right - with many more stories to tell.

Video: 
Travis Gilmour
Tyson Gilmour

Story:
Travis Gilmour

Unbroken - Alaska Fly Fishing Film

From Fly Out Ambassador Camille Egdorf

Fly Out Ambassador, Camille Egdorf steps it up a notch with a new film showcasing the Alaska bush life on her family's Upper Nushagak Camp - titled Unbroken. This time, her film will be featured on the big screen with the International Fly Fishing Film Festival (IF4). 

From the filmmaker: 

"Unbroken", a Camille Egdorf film, captures the wildlife, fishing and a way of life that has been carried on in Alaska for over thirty years. A story about a fly fishing family who's summers are spent in remote Alaska, sharing and experiencing the wilds of the North. This is their story.

Music: "The Covenant" AJ Hochhalter

See Camille's first fly fishing film - forget me knot

Custom Fly Out Knives - For Sale

From Bolduc Knives

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We asked specialty knife maker, Gary Bolduc, to design and manufacture a special edition Fly Out knife that is extremely tough and multi-functional, and engraved with our signature bush plane logo. It is a fantastic utility, hunting, backpacking, and all purpose knife that is a tough little monster! It has a stone wash finish 3.5" blade, para cord wrap 4" handle built out of S35VN stainless steel with a kydex sheath. The knife is super slim, yet tough as nails, extremely light weight, with 2 lanyard holes for pole lashing or handle pull & spine gimping for finger control.  Holes in kydex sheath allow you to tie it anywhere you want or use the belt loop to carry.

Bolduc Knives is synonymous with quality when it comes to the knife industry for sportsmen. Many of his hunting and fishing knives are inspired by Alaska, and we're proud to have one of his products bear the Fly Out brand. You can purchase a Fly Out knife by emailing us at . These knives start at $150 + shipping. Different knife handles are available upon request. 

Bowls-pipes-amp-antler-bowls-0011-300x225About Gary:

Raised as a young man in Vermont attracted my interest to the views of the rolling hills, country back roads and flowing streams. Around eight or nine years of age, I started exploring the geography within a 2 or 3 mile radius of my home in the countryside. I would collect stones, odd pieces of wood, or whatever I thought was interesting. I always wondered what was over the next hill, usually climbing a tree for a better vision if I dared not to venture any further. As I grew older, I lost this fear and traveled as far as I could in one day, of course, coming home exhausted. Once I turned sixteen and obtained a driver's license, I was allowed to explore vast areas via back country roads. I would stop at interesting streams, apple orchards gone wild and maple tree stands of forest for a new exploration, all of the time watching for deer, woodchucks, partridge, hawks, squirrels and whatever else I would happen upon or would cross my path.

Read More about Gary Bolduc

Alaska - The Nutrient Cycle

From Paul Claver

A fantastic look at the life cycle and nutrient cycle of Alaska's wild salmon. These fish give us so much, it is our responsible to protect the best we have left.

From the Filmaker: 

Once they enter fresh water chum salmon stop feeding and morph into an aggressive creature intent only on mating. After spawning, they die and their bodies become a source of nutrients for everything in the forest and sea.

Very special thanks to Lynn Schooler, who without I could not have made this short. Special thanks to Richard Nelson, Hank Lentfer, Riley Woodford and Henk Meeuwsen for providing additional sounds.
To Lynn & Michio, whose stories and adventures inspired me to come to Alaska.


UPDATE - Shot over the course of three weeks with a Canon 5d and a GoPro. Music: Smetana - Má Vlast (The Moldau) and Górecki - Symphony No. 3: Il Lento E Largo

Disabled Anglers & Army Vets on Expedition in Bristol Bay

Trip Report by Mark Rutherford

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A week on the Togiak River with Warren MacDonald, who fly fishes from his wheelchair, and with Nick Watson – disabled Army Ranger / founder of Veterans Expeditions, and Dick Watson, his father – a Vietnam Veteran.

From the trip log: "Some hours we passed through schools of salmon and Dolly Varden Char and other hours we fished through a pristine river devoid of fish but full of beauty. We travelled in all kinds of weather and that felt like we were earning our place among the wildlife on the landscape, as only those who live exposed out in the elements, can earn their passage. Some days we saw a powerboat from a fishing lodge or from Togiak Village, and they gazed at the wheelchair lashed on our raft and raised a hand of greeting.

I knew within seconds of meeting former Army Ranger Nick Watson that his outlook on life and his good attitude about challenges would help make our fly-fishing expedition a success. As he deplaned in Dillingham I reached out to shake his hand and was amazed at what he handed me! Oops I should have remembered that it was his right hand that had been re-shaped by 6 surgeries.

The partial hand that returned my handshake was strong and calloused and the human face above it smiled saying that he was pleased to meet me. His father, Dick Watson, reached out and crushed my hand saying that he'd fished for Striped Bass all his life in New England and was excited to learn to fly fish with his son for salmon and trout.

Down the hall rolled our third angler, Warren MacDonald on an all terrain wheelchair. Warren is a "double- below the knee- amputee". He had a big grin upon arrival and while we headed to the baggage claim I told him that I was surprised at how he'd deplaned so quickly. I couldn't mentally grasp how he'd descended Dillingham's old-fashioned aircraft stairs, which are like those used on DC 3's in the 1950's, as fast as the other passengers. He explained in a very understated manner that he appreciated the flight crew's offers of assistance to transfer him to an aisle wheel chair and help him down the stairs but that he'd maneuvered down the aisle and then the stairs using his arms, torso, and the stumps of legs. He said it takes him more time explaining to various airport agents how he could manage it by himself -than it takes just launching down the stairs.

Read the rest of the trip report! 

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Photo Credit: Dave McCoy

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