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Custom Fly Out Knives - For Sale

From Bolduc Knives

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We asked specialty knife maker, Gary Bolduc, to design and manufacture a special edition Fly Out knife that is extremely tough and multi-functional, and engraved with our signature bush plane logo. It is a fantastic utility, hunting, backpacking, and all purpose knife that is a tough little monster! It has a stone wash finish 3.5" blade, para cord wrap 4" handle built out of S35VN stainless steel with a kydex sheath. The knife is super slim, yet tough as nails, extremely light weight, with 2 lanyard holes for pole lashing or handle pull & spine gimping for finger control.  Holes in kydex sheath allow you to tie it anywhere you want or use the belt loop to carry.

Bolduc Knives is synonymous with quality when it comes to the knife industry for sportsmen. Many of his hunting and fishing knives are inspired by Alaska, and we're proud to have one of his products bear the Fly Out brand. You can purchase a Fly Out knife by emailing us at . These knives start at $150 + shipping. Different knife handles are available upon request. 

Bowls-pipes-amp-antler-bowls-0011-300x225About Gary:

Raised as a young man in Vermont attracted my interest to the views of the rolling hills, country back roads and flowing streams. Around eight or nine years of age, I started exploring the geography within a 2 or 3 mile radius of my home in the countryside. I would collect stones, odd pieces of wood, or whatever I thought was interesting. I always wondered what was over the next hill, usually climbing a tree for a better vision if I dared not to venture any further. As I grew older, I lost this fear and traveled as far as I could in one day, of course, coming home exhausted. Once I turned sixteen and obtained a driver's license, I was allowed to explore vast areas via back country roads. I would stop at interesting streams, apple orchards gone wild and maple tree stands of forest for a new exploration, all of the time watching for deer, woodchucks, partridge, hawks, squirrels and whatever else I would happen upon or would cross my path.

Read More about Gary Bolduc

Disabled Anglers & Army Vets on Expedition in Bristol Bay

Trip Report by Mark Rutherford

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A week on the Togiak River with Warren MacDonald, who fly fishes from his wheelchair, and with Nick Watson – disabled Army Ranger / founder of Veterans Expeditions, and Dick Watson, his father – a Vietnam Veteran.

From the trip log: "Some hours we passed through schools of salmon and Dolly Varden Char and other hours we fished through a pristine river devoid of fish but full of beauty. We travelled in all kinds of weather and that felt like we were earning our place among the wildlife on the landscape, as only those who live exposed out in the elements, can earn their passage. Some days we saw a powerboat from a fishing lodge or from Togiak Village, and they gazed at the wheelchair lashed on our raft and raised a hand of greeting.

I knew within seconds of meeting former Army Ranger Nick Watson that his outlook on life and his good attitude about challenges would help make our fly-fishing expedition a success. As he deplaned in Dillingham I reached out to shake his hand and was amazed at what he handed me! Oops I should have remembered that it was his right hand that had been re-shaped by 6 surgeries.

The partial hand that returned my handshake was strong and calloused and the human face above it smiled saying that he was pleased to meet me. His father, Dick Watson, reached out and crushed my hand saying that he'd fished for Striped Bass all his life in New England and was excited to learn to fly fish with his son for salmon and trout.

Down the hall rolled our third angler, Warren MacDonald on an all terrain wheelchair. Warren is a "double- below the knee- amputee". He had a big grin upon arrival and while we headed to the baggage claim I told him that I was surprised at how he'd deplaned so quickly. I couldn't mentally grasp how he'd descended Dillingham's old-fashioned aircraft stairs, which are like those used on DC 3's in the 1950's, as fast as the other passengers. He explained in a very understated manner that he appreciated the flight crew's offers of assistance to transfer him to an aisle wheel chair and help him down the stairs but that he'd maneuvered down the aisle and then the stairs using his arms, torso, and the stumps of legs. He said it takes him more time explaining to various airport agents how he could manage it by himself -than it takes just launching down the stairs.

Read the rest of the trip report! 

View the embedded image gallery online at:
https://alaskaflyout.com/blog/6#sigProId217fbff9dd

Photo Credit: Dave McCoy

Custom Fillet Knives for Alaska

From Bolduc Knives

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I personally got the opportunity to test one of Gary Bolduc's custom fillet knives in Alaska this past summer, and if I'm giving out grades - I'm handing out all A's. Honestly, I don't normally get excited about knife designs, carbon rich steel, or the like. But, this particular knife was impressive in its stiffness and specific functionality toward filleting salmon. 

A good fillet knife is worth its weight in gold, and as guides and outdoor professionals, having functional equipment that works everytime is paramount. These fillet knives are not only tough, but they're also beautiful. These knives are works of art - and they add a degree of professionalism to those fishing guides that use them. If you're a serious sportsman that takes pride in the quality of your fish fillets - check out Bolduc Knives

From Gary Bolduc himself: 

My knife ergo dynamics involves human factor science for increasing the ease, comfort and control of the blade during the filleting process. Length, thickness, design, comfort, hand control and sharpness have all been equated to produce the qualities my knives provide. Almost any filet knife will get the job done, although it would be more beneficial to filet quicker, easier and more accurate to not waste valuable meat and time away from the stream.

Fishing is a very enjoyable sport, but filleting your catch is an undesirable chore to most fishermen, including myself; therefore I have challenged to reduce the undesirables in my filet knives by consulting professional Alaskan Fishing Guides thoughts and opinions with my own experiences and testing for two years to produce the finest filet knives made today.

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Catch Magazine Issue 29 - Alaska Photos

Featuring Tikchik Narrows Lodge

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Tikchik Narrows Lodge pilot Steve Larsen's photography is featured in the newest Catch Magazine - issue 29. Incredible images of Bristol Bay! Distinctly Alaska. Subscribe today! 

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From the Magazine: 

Steve Larsen grew up in Seattle and departed for Alaska in the early 80's to pursue a seaplane flying career on Kodiak Island. After flying for 12 years on Kodiak he started looking at the lodge flying business. A perfect fit for Steve awaited at Tikchik Narrows Lodge - a new adventure and more time for photography.

Steve has accumulated over 19,000 hours and 30 years of flying in SW Alaska, The Alaska Peninsula and Bristol Bay. This will be his 20th season at Tikchik Narrows Lodge. 95% of his flying is in a Dehaviland Beaver - a great platform for aerial photography.

 

Resources for the Soul

By Cory Luoma

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To Americans, and even to westerners, the enormity of "wild" Alaska is truly unfathomable. It is like talking about Bill Gates' money or the distance between the closest star and planet Earth; the vastness transcends our human understanding. I have spent 5 summers in Alaska – flying, guiding, filming, fishing, loving, and living. And every year, when I return to the Great Land, my jaw drops, and my fish bum brain short-circuits, preventing any worldly comprehension. Amidst it all, the subtlest miracles are occurring. Millions of salmon are running to their spawning grounds, balls of smolt are fleeing to the sea, and a pure and intact ecosystem comes to life right in front of our eyes with the dawn of summer. The mystery overcomes me, a rush surges through my spine, and the only things tangible are the goose bumps. That is the infinity moment that we all seek as human beings – a truly scarce resource in this day in age.

Sportsmen Put on Your Rally Caps

Comment to EPA Before May 31st

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Speak up to the EPA sportsmen and women. We need your comments before the May 31st deadline. Bristol Bay's salmon economy and culture are too valuable to risk large scale mining in the area. It takes 1-minute to send a comment. 

This may be our last chance to save the best we have left. 

CLICK HERE

C'Mon Mark Begich

Put the Pressure on Sen. Mark Begich

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Sen. Mark Begich cautiously weighed in on the revised draft in a Friday statement:  

"While I remain opposed to a pre-emptive veto of this or any other project, an open, public process that answers Alaskans' questions and puts better science on the table is a good thing. I look forward to reviewing this assessment and hope it answers questions about whether this project can meet the high hurdle of developing a large-scale mine while protecting our renewable resources."

The EPA and scientists all over the world have spoken. It is time to hold our representatives accountable. Email Senator Mark Begich and let him know that Bristol Bay's wild salmon, wildlife, economy, and cultural heritage are too valuable for large-scale mining. 

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